Wednesday, October 22, 2014

How NOT To Beg For A Shorty Award on Twitter

January 15, 2011 by  
Filed under Social Media

Shorty Awards are here again, and just like any awards program where people need to be nominated and voted for, some people truly have no clue that their incessant begging will more often than not, force people to vote against them, or at minimum do more harm than good.

Truth is, if you have earned it, you will not have to ask for votes at all.

So I have composed a list of suggestions to avoid alienating all of your friends when vying for a voter-based award.

1. DON’T DM All of Your Followers Begging for Votes.

Trust me your true friends will see your public announcements about the award nomination, and the ones that haven’t are not really paying attention to your tweets anyway. Begin with your closest friends. As they vote for you, your message will spread naturally. If it doesn’t, then you definitely should keep reading.

2. DON’T Make Negative Statements About Those That Don’t Vote For You

The second you make that negative statement, whether it’s public or private, it will start circulating through the twitter grapevine very quickly. Remember, they may not be supporting you because they aren’t convinced you have earned the award. Making that negative statement guarantees you will not get their support, and probably cause you to lose many more votes.

3. DON’T Remind People In Public That They Have A DM From You

This is annoying even when people are not asking for votes…however, trust me, they have probably seen the direct message, and they are simply trying to decide how to handle this possibly awkward request from a friend. Even worse, others seeing you post publicly know the pressure you are putting on yet another friend, and the future conversations will not be in your favor. Respect their right to ignore it and save the friendship.

4. DON’T Send Reminders To People That Have Not Voted For You

Honestly this is the way this blog was inspired. Someone asked me how to handle someone that was begging for votes but for months had ignored their requests for help. They truly did not believe the person deserved a Shorty Award for anything other than maybe being annoying.

5. DON’T Tell Anyone You Are Disappointed In Someone

If a friend declines to vote for you, don’t make things worse by declaring that you are disappointed in them. If makes no difference whether you tell them directly, or express it to a trusted friend, experience has shown, they will find out. The finger-pointing will only serve to look bad on you. Use this opportunity to ask for honest criticism on what they feel you could do better to earn their support in the future.

6. DON’T Spam People With Announcements

If you choose to announce once (maybe even twice) a day that you appreciate their votes, fine. But tweeting numerous times each day, and cross-posting over several accounts you own and operate  screams of desperation.

It’s good to alert people to awards they may not have known existed. Get  creative and share rules about the awards, write blogs about categories and people who have been nominated. Be smart. But if you haven’t even been nominated, or you are forcing people to nominate you, then maybe you should rethink your strategy for next year.

7.  DON’T DM People That You Have Not Spoken To In Months

This one is totally common sense, but if you don’t have a current relationship with them, chances are your request will come across as awkward and desperate….rightly so, because at this point, when you are messaging people you barely speak to… you are desperate.

8. DON’T Retweet Every Single Vote You Get

Don’t brag. Simply reply and thank them for their support. Retweeting compliments, votes or praise of any kind has always felt wrong to me. It’s like running through a crowd holding up a sign that says, “Look someone likes me!”  Trust me, they will not like you as much after you have flaunted every compliment  in front of them dozens of times a day.

9.  DON’T Trash The Competition

It’s so easy to get competitive and want to make this into a quasi-presidential election, but social media is not politics, and trashing people in social media for a vote, even when done in private, can do far more damage to your reputation than winning any award could ever recoup.

10.  DON’T Ever Feel You Deserve Any Award

Once your ego has reached a point that you feel you deserve an award more than anyone else, and you are honestly angry that you aren’t the top person nominated, your behavior has become irrational. It’s truly time to step back and review what you can do to improve not only your attitude, but also the way people see you in social media. And if you think this blog is about you… well,  it probably is.

Comments

3 Responses to “How NOT To Beg For A Shorty Award on Twitter”
  1. Great article, Susan.

    You are 100% right.

    Unfortunately, I think I violated points #6 and #8. Since you’re right on both, I’m taking your suggestions to heart, and will ratchet back.

    When Susan speaks, I listen.

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